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:: Did you know? ::

AWT IMAGEDid you know?

  • 1 in 8 women will be diagnosed with breast cancer
  • A healthy diet & exercise routine can reduce your chance for breast cancer by nearly 40%
  • When caught early, breast cancer has a 98% survival rate
  • Nearly 85% of women diagnosed with breast cancer DO NOT have a family history

Know the symptoms of breast cancer

Early breast cancer usually doesn’t cause symptoms. But as the tumor grows, it can change how the breast looks or feels.

  • A lump or thickening in or near the breast or in the underarm area
  • A change in the size or shape of the breast
  • Dimpling or puckering in the skin of the breast
  • A nipple turned inward into the breast
  • Discharge (fluid) from the nipple, especially if it’s bloody
  • Scaly, red, or swollen skin on the breast or nipple
  • The skin may have pitting so that it looks like an orange

These symptoms do not automatically indicate breast cancer. But, if you have any of these conditions, you should tell your health care provider so that the problems can be diagnosed and treated.

Knowing Your Body:

For women under 50-years old:

  • Employ annual clinical breast examinations and monthly breast self-examinations as your primary early detection protocol.
  • Once a year, every year, without fail, schedule an appointment with your healthcare provider to perform a clinical breast examination. We recommend you schedule it on or near your birthday.
  • Once a month, every month, without fail, set aside 15 minutes to conduct thorough breast self-examination. We recommend you schedule it on the first day of menstruation.
  • Schedule a mammogram only if needed for diagnosis of a suspected lump. Even then, be sure to schedule that mammogram within the first 14 days of your menstrual cycle.
  • In addition, you may wish to employ annual thermography screening between the ages of 30 and 50.
  • If you are between the ages of 20 and 30, consider a thermogram every two years in addition to your monthly breast self-examinations.

For women over 50-years old:

  • Employ annual clinical breast examinations and monthly breast self-examinations as your primary early detection protocol.
  • Once a year, every year, without fail, schedule an appointment with your healthcare provider to perform a clinical breast examination. We recommend you schedule it on or near your birthday.
  • Once a month, every month, without fail, set aside 15 minutes to conduct a thorough breast self-examination. We recommend you schedule it on the first day of your period if you are still menstruating.
  • Schedule a mammogram if you discover a lump. Even then, be sure to schedule that mammogram within the first 14 days of your menstrual cycle if you are still menstruating.
  • Employ mammography screening every other year.
  • Consider thermography screening on alternate years.
  • If a positive result comes back from the thermogram, schedule a mammogram.

Steps to help you respond with maximum intelligence to this diagnosis and help you rebuild your self-healing functions.

The basic action points are:

  1. Examine. Step back from the day-to-day pressures of your life to evaluate your current situation in its entirety.
  2. Discover. Assess both current life issues that must be changed as well as future needs that must be met.
  3. Plan. Create a simple plan to restore health and total well-being.
  4. Implement. Work in partnership with health advisors who have your confidence. Begin a self-care plan to create whole-person well-being.
  5. Review. Conduct quarterly reviews of your progress, making adjustments as necessary.

Taken together, these action points will play the central role in mobilizing all your healing options and capacities, both external and internal.

The Breast Cancer Prevention Lifestyle
Yes, you can maximize your potential for actually preventing breast cancer! It’s all about personal choices in how we take care of ourselves.

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:: Learning About Your Family Background ::
 | Post date: 2016/05/14 | 

Learning About Your Family Background 

Whether you and/or some of your family members have had breast cancer, you may be interested in the possibility of genetic testing. The best way to get started is to learn more about your family history on both your mother’s and your father’s side. An abnormal gene that increases breast cancer risk is more likely to run in your family if:

  • Many women in your family have had breast and/or ovarian cancer, particularly at a younger age than these cancers typically develop (before age 50).
  • Some women in your family have had cancer involving both breasts.
  • There is both breast and ovarian cancer in your family.
  • Men in your family have had breast cancer.
  • There is breast cancer in your family and either male relatives on the same side of the family have had prostate cancer at a young age, or male or female relatives on the same side of the family have had gastrointestinal cancers, such as cancer of the pancreas, gall bladder, or stomach.
  • Your family is of Ashkenazi (Eastern European) Jewish descent.
  • More than two people in your family have cancer.

If any of these are true for either side of your family, you may be a candidate for genetic testing. You may want to meet with a genetic counselor, a medical professional specially trained to understand and provide information about genetics and disease. To find a genetic counselor who specializes in family-related cancer risk, talk to your doctor or check with the hospitals and cancer centers in your area. You also can contact the Iranian Breast Cancer Research Center www.ibrcrc.ir

The genetic counselor will work with you to build a family tree that shows all of the cases of breast, ovarian, and other types of cancer in your family, along with the ages at which they occurred. This visual history can help you determine whether or not genetic testing makes sense for you. Before you can build this family tree, however, you may need to do some research.

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:: Tomato-Rich Diet May Protect Against Prostate Cancer ::
 | Post date: 2014/09/27 | 

AWT IMAGETomato-Rich Diet May Protect Against Prostate Cancer

By Anna Azvolinsky, PhD

  Men who increased their consumption of fruits and vegetables—tomato products in particular—had a lower overall risk of prostate cancer, according to the results of a new study, which was published in Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention.

  Men who followed recommendations to eat a diet rich in plant foods had a 9% lower overall risk of prostate cancer for each incremental increase of vegetable consumption (P = 0.04).

  Men who consumed more than 10 portions per week of tomato-based foods, including tomato juice and baked beans, had an 18% lower risk of developing localized prostate cancer.

  Vanessa Er, PhD, of the School of Social and Community Medicine at the University of Bristol and Bristol Nutrition BRU, and colleagues at the University of Cambridge and University of Oxford in the United Kingdom assessed whether following dietary recommendations by the World Cancer Research Fund (WCRF) and the American Institute for Cancer Research (AICR) could help to specifically prevent prostate cancer.

  The researchers compared 1,806 prostate cancer patients, who were diagnosed using prostate-specific antigen (PSA) screening, with 12,005 controls who took part in the United Kingdom–based Prostate Testing for Cancer and Treatment (ProtecT) trial. All of the study participants were between the ages of 50 and 69. The team created a prostate cancer dietary index that included three dietary factors—selenium, calcium, and lycopene-containing foods—that were previously strongly linked with risk of prostate cancer.

  Men in the study self-reported detailed daily food intake, including portion sizes.

  The decrease in risk of prostate cancer as a result of eating a diet rich in tomato-based foods is thought to be due to lycopene, a carotenoid pigment and phytochemical commonly found in tomatoes and some other red fruits and vegetables. Lycopene is known to have antioxidant properties.

  “While lycopene is more bioavailable in tomato products as a result of food processing and preparation, men should consume pizza, tomato sauce, and baked beans in moderation due to their high salt, sugar, and fat content,” stated the authors.

  A high consumption of fruits and vegetables, particularly cruciferous vegetables, has been linked to decreased prostate cancer incidence and progression in some studies. Still, the literature on this is inconsistent, as other studies have found no link between high vegetable and fruit consumption and prostate cancer risk. Further studies are needed to confirm these findings.

  “Men should still eat a wide variety of fruits and vegetables, maintain a healthy weight, and stay active,” said Er in a statement.

  The study did not find a link between calcium and selenium consumption and prostate cancer risk. According to the authors, this may be due to self-reporting and a lack of detailed information on the dosage and frequencies of these supplements, which may have been underestimated.

  While adherence to the authors’ prostate cancer dietary index resulted in a decreased risk of prostate cancer, this study did not provide evidence for a decreased risk of the cancer upon adherence to the WCRF/AICR recommendations.

  Higher intake of lycopene-containing foods was also recently found to be associated with a lower risk of aggressive prostate cancer, and was linked with a lower risk of breast cancer in postmenopausal women.

 See more at: http://www.cancernetwork.com/genitourinary-cancers/tomato-rich-diet-may-protect-against-prostate-cancer

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پژوهشکده معتمد جهاد دانشگاهی Motamed Cancer Institute
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